Where did Garden Water Fountains Begin?

6278-10203__97528.jpg A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to provide drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Pure functionality was the original purpose of fountains. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to supply drinkable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Used until the nineteenth century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their source of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from the power of gravity. Fountains were not only used as a water source for drinking water, but also to adorn homes and celebrate the designer who created it. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often times used by Romans to beautify their fountains. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners included fountains to create smaller depictions of the gardens of paradise. Fountains played a considerable role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were extolled with baroque style fountains built to mark the arrival points of Roman aqueducts.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for fresh, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely decorative. Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to permit fountains to bring in clean water and allow for beautiful water displays.

Nowadays, fountains decorate public areas and are used to recognize individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

The Intriguing Origin of the Wall Fountain

While he was looking to make Rome the capital of the Christian world, Pope Nicholas V took advantage of the opportunity to request translations of Ancient Greek books, converting them to Latin. This brought Rome (and himself) recognition in the Christian world.

The damaged Roman aqueduct, Acqua Vergine, was used for giving fresh drinking water to the city from a distance of 8 miles and he started rebuilding it in 1453. He also reinstated the practice of using mostras to mark the end point point of an aqueduct with a marvelous, attractive fountain. Commissioning a renowned architect was the next step, and Leon Alberti began to design and construct a wall fountain in the heart of Rome. Pope Nicholas V's dedication to making Rome the focus of the Christian world, and provide a supply of quality drinking water to her residents led to the concept of the wall fountain.

Water Features Commonplace in Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is finished without a water element. You will often find Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are regarded as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing. Since water is meant to be the focal point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very straightforward.

You will also notice many fountains that have spouts made of bamboo. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, collects the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. Even when new, it should be crafted to look as if it has been outdoors for a long time. So that the fountain looks at one with nature, people normally adorn it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Clearly, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

An alternative is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. After some years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss grows over the stone.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, out in a much bigger water feature. Popular water feature extras are a koi pond or any sort of little pool, or even a wandering brook.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Potential alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to symbolize water. In addition, flat stones can be laid out close enough together to give the illusion of a rippling brook.

Water Fountains: The Minoan Culture

On the Greek island of Crete, digs have unearthed conduits of multiple kinds.

They not only aided with the water sources, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. The chief ingredients employed were rock or terracotta. Whenever manufactured from terracotta, they were commonly in the shape of canals and circular or rectangle-shaped pipes. These incorporated cone-like and U-shaped terracotta piping which were exclusive to the Minoans. Terracotta piping were put down below the floor surfaces at Knossos Palace and used to circulate water. These Minoan conduits were also utilized for collecting and stocking water, not just distribution. This called for the terracotta conduits to be capable of holding water without leaking. Below ground Water Transportation: At first this system would seem to have been designed not quite for convenience but to offer water to certain people or rites without it being observed. Quality Water Transportation: Many historians feel that these conduits were utilized to develop a separate distribution system for the palace.

Short History of Fountains

All through history, water fountains have been an essential part of every city and settlement, even playing a role in each civilization’s myths and legends. We have not always had indoor piping, so earlier folk took journeys to the local fountain when they required drinking water. The water fountains also provide a calming and captivating backdrop to religious rituals and other ceremonies. Water fountains have some other religious uses, such as purifying worshipers during rituals, as well as militaristic functions, such as helping the town to endure blockades. The Castalia fountain at Delphi is one prominent case of the significant role they place in the cultural everyday lives of the local people.

The Original Outdoor Water Feature Designers

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars, all in one, fountain creators were multi-faceted individuals from the 16th to the late 18th century. Leonardo da Vinci as a inspired genius, inventor and scientific virtuoso exemplified this Renaissance master. The forces of nature inspired him to examine the qualities and motion of water, and due to his fascination, he carefully recorded his findings in his now famed notebooks. Combining inventiveness with hydraulic and landscaping talent, early Italian water fountain developers transformed private villa settings into amazing water displays complete with emblematic implications and natural beauty. The splendors in Tivoli were provided by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was celebrated for his skill in archeology, architecture and garden design. Other water feature developers, masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water functions and water antics for the various properties near Florence, were well-versed in humanist topics and traditional scientific readings.

Anglo-Saxon Gardens During the Norman Conquest

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was considerably changed by the introduction of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The Normans were much better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. But before centering on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire society. Because of this, castles were cruder constructions than monasteries: Monasteries were frequently immense stone buildings located in the biggest and most fertile valleys, while castles were erected on windy crests where their inhabitants dedicated time and space to projects for offense and defense. Tranquil pastimes such as gardening were out of place in these destitute citadels. Berkeley Castle is perhaps the most complete model in existence nowadays of the early Anglo-Norman form of architecture. It is said that the keep was introduced during William the Conqueror's time. A significant terrace serves as a discouraging factor to invaders who would attempt to mine the walls of the building. A scenic bowling green, covered in grass and bordered by battlements cut out of an ancient yew hedge, creates one of the terraces.


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