The Latest Addition to the Chatsworth Gardens: Revelation

“Revelation,” the latest addition to the ornamental garden fountains of Chatsworth, was created by recognized British sculptor Angela Conner. The late 11th Duke of Devonshire commissioned her, because of her work in brass and steel, to design a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth in commemoration of the Queen’s 80th birthday bash. One of Chatsworth’s earliest ponds, Jack Pond, had “Revelation” mounted in it in 1999. The four big metallic flower petals close and open with the flow of water, alternatively concealing and revealing a gold colored globe at the sculpture’s center. The sculpture’s proportions are five meters in height by five meters in width and includes a steel globe coated with gold dust. s-322__76404.jpg This newest water feature is an exciting and interesting improvement to the Gardens of Chatsworth, because the movement of flower petals is totally run by water.

The Water Garden Fountains

Towns and villages depended on practical water fountains to conduct water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning from local sources like ponds, channels, or springs. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was necessary to pressurize the flow and send water spraying from the fountain's spout, a system without equal until the late nineteenth century. The elegance and spectacle of fountains make them perfect for historical monuments. The common fountains of today bear little likeness to the first water fountains. A stone basin, crafted from rock, was the first fountain, used for holding water for drinking and spiritual purposes. Pure stone basins as fountains have been found from 2000 B.C.. The very first civilizations that made use of fountains depended on gravity to drive water through spigots. Situated near aqueducts or springs, the functional public water fountains provided the local citizens with fresh drinking water. Fountains with flowery decoration started to appear in Rome in approx. 6 B.C., commonly gods and wildlife, made with natural stone or bronze. A well-engineered collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

Selecting the Best Material for your Wall Water Fountain

Selecting the ideal material for your wall mounted fountain is completely up to you. Fiberglass is an excellent choice due to the fact that this material is strong, light and waterproof. Furthermore, this type of fountain can be easily shipped and does not require the use of a big truck for delivery.

Although the majority of them are made of metal, including copper, other excellent materials include stone, clay, and wood. The best material for your fountain remains copper, even though it has become quite costly due to recent price hikes. Use cast stone to design a gorgeous fountain resembling the traditional Mediterranean wall fountains usually found in Italy, Spain, and France. These molded, cast stone concrete features are exceptionally durable and suitable to be placed on the floor against a wall. Manufactured in the USA due to high shipping costs, they are generally available in a variety of hues.

The Intriguing Origin of the Water Wall Fountain

As the leader of the Catholic Church, the scholarly Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455} decided to authorize translations of important invaluable books from Greek to Latin. The destroyed Roman aqueduct, Acqua Vergine, was utilized for giving clean drinking water to the city from a extended distance of 8 miles and he started rebuilding it in 1453. The Pope also revitalized the custom of using spectacular and beautiful water fountains, known as "mostras", to mark the entry point of an aqueduct. As amazing as the Trevi fountain is, you might find it interesting to know that its roots were from a design for the 1st wall fountain, a simple water feature created by Leon Alberti on a commission from Pope Nicholas V. Remarkably, the famous fountain of Trevi was born of the desire for Rome to become the christian capital of the known world, and was its first wall fountain.

The Good Aspects of Disappearing Water Elements

Another name for a disappearing fountain is a “pondless” fountain. The origin of the water is not visible because it is underneath the surface of the ground. Any area where there are people, such as a walking path, is ideal for a disappearing fountain since it adds pleasant sounds and a lovely visual effect. It is easy to find the kind that is right for you, as there are so many to pick from such as millstones, ceramic urns, waterfalls, and also those with granite columns.

A disappearing fountain could be the most appropriate choice for you for many reasons. The water rises from underground and does not form a large pool above ground so any danger to those around it is reduced. This means that children can safely be around it. Additionally, due to the fact that water is stored underground, none of it is lost to evaporation. This type of fountain, therefore, is a good choice for regions where there is a need to reduce water consumption. It is very low-maintenance since it is below ground and not exposed to dirt or algae. Finally, due to its reduced size, it is less difficult to fit it where you want it than other types of fountains.

Contemporary Garden Decor: Large Outdoor Water Fountains and their Roots

The incredible architecture of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complete your home.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Residents of urban areas, townships and small towns used them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash, which meant that fountains needed to be connected to nearby aqueduct or spring. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains operated using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Serving as an element of decoration and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water. Roman fountains usually depicted images of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create smaller depictions of the gardens of paradise. The fountains seen in the Gardens of Versailles were intended to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. To mark the entrance of the restored Roman aqueducts, the Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries commissioned the building of baroque style fountains in the spot where the aqueducts arrived in the city of Rome

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for clean, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity allowed fountains to deliver recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

Embellishing city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the functions of modern-day fountains.

The Prevalence of Japanese Water Elements

A water feature is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical cleaning, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. Since water is the most important component of any Japanese fountain, the design is usually simple.

You will also see many fountains that have spouts built of bamboo. The water moves through the bamboo spout and collects in the stone basin below. People usually make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. People want their fountain to seem as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just nice decor.

If you want to get a bit more artistic, try a stone fountain decorated with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. The aim is that over time it will start to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape, as moss slowly grows over the stones.

If you are lucky enough to have a big section of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Consider adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

There are different options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Potential alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to give the illusion of moving water.


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