Where did Landscape Fountains Begin?

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to provide drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes. 115447-11603__61861.jpg

From the beginning, outdoor fountains were soley there to serve as functional elements. Residents of cities, townships and small towns used them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash, which meant that fountains needed to be linked to nearby aqueduct or spring. Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be higher and closer to a water supply, including aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Fountains were an optimal source of water, and also served to adorn living areas and memorialize the designer. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often times utilized by Romans to decorate their fountains. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to re-create the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to laud their positions by including decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Indoor plumbing became the main source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity helped fountains to deliver recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

Embellishing city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the uses of modern-day fountains.

A Small Garden Space? Don't Feel Left Out! You Can Still Have a Water Fountain

Since water is reflective, it has the effect of making a small space appear larger than it is. In order to generate the maximum reflective properties of a water element or fountain, it is best to use dark materials. When the sun goes down, you can use underwater lights in a variety of colors and shapes to light up your new feature. The sun is required to power eco-lights during the day time while underwater lights are great for night use. Often utilized in natural therapies, they help to lessen anxiety and stress with their calming sounds.

Water just mixes into the greenery in your backyard. People will be focused on the pond, artificial river or fountain in your yard. Small verandas or large gardens is the perfect place to put in a water element. The atmosphere can be significantly modified by placing it in the best place and using the right accessories.

Outdoor Garden Fountain Designers Through History

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the late 18th century, fountain designers were multi-talented people, Throughout the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the artist as an imaginative intellect, creator and scientific expert. The forces of nature led him to analyze the properties and movement of water, and due to his fascination, he methodically recorded his findings in his now famed notebooks. Early Italian fountain designers altered private villa settings into amazing water exhibits complete with emblematic meaning and natural charm by coupling creativity with hydraulic and horticultural talent. The humanist Pirro Ligorio provided the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli and was recognized for his abilities in archeology, architecture and garden concepts. Other fountain developers, masterminding the incredible water marbles, water attributes and water humor for the countless properties near Florence, were well-versed in humanistic subject areas and time-honored scientific texts.

Fountains: The Minoan Culture

During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, a variety of types of channels have been discovered. They not merely aided with the water supplies, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. Rock and clay were the substances of choice for these conduits. When made from terracotta, they were commonly in the format of canals and spherical or rectangle-shaped conduits. Among these were clay conduits that were U shaped or a shortened, cone-like shape which have just showed up in Minoan culture. Terracotta pipes were installed beneath the floor surfaces at Knossos Palace and used to circulate water. The pipelines also had other applications such as amassing water and conveying it to a primary site for storage. Therefore, these pipelines had to be effective to: Underground Water Transportation: the undetectable process for water distribution may have been employed to provide water to certain people or activities. Quality Water Transportation: Given the data, a number of scholars suggest that these pipes were not hooked up to the popular water distribution process, providing the palace with water from a distinctive source.

The Nature of Splash Fountains

Splash fountains, often referred to as bathing fountains, are there for people to cool off on especially scorchingsummer days. For this reason, they are also known as interactive fountains. Allowing easy entry, these fountains also include nonslip surfaces and no standing water to eliminate drowning risks or the need for lifeguards or supervision. These ”spraygrounds” are splash pads often found in community pools, parks, or playgrounds. Some splash fountains, like the one in Dundas Square in Toronto, Canada, heat the water by using solar energy captured via the special dark-colored granite slabs.

This fountain uses six-hundred ground nozzles in groups of thirty (three rows of 10 spigots). Each grouping of the 30 nozzles is found below a stainless-steel grille. In the main walkway through Dundas Square you will see the 20 grilles made up of 2 rows of 10.

Feng Shui Can Add a Great Deal to Your Yard

Feel the health benefits of feng shui by introducing its design elements into your yard.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not particularly important when introducing feng shui design to it. If you have a lush, eye-catching one, that is great, but even a smaller area works well with feng shui design.

Feng shui techniques are identical whether you are working in your garden or your residence. In order to understand the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first have to understand your home’s bagua.

It is also important to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to make the most of its energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is important to integrate it. A Zen garden with some nice natural rocks is ideal for that spot, as the rocks represent the Earth element.

Give some thought to incorporating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

The Prevalence of Japanese Water Features

You will rarely see a Japanese garden that does not feature a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are viewed as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simplistic because they are meant to draw attention to the water itself.

Many people also choose a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, receives the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. People generally make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. It is vital that the overall look of the fountain fits in with the natural environment, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. As you can likely guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than just decorative.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain enhanced with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the option to build a more extensive water feature. Consider adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. It is appropriate to use representations of water instead of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to give the illusion of a babbling brook.


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The Early Society: Garden Fountains
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