Can Wall Water Fountains Help Cleanse The Air?

94_124_xx02_rustlite__09434.jpg If what you want is to breathe life into an otherwise dull ambiance, an indoor wall fountain can be the answer. Your senses and your wellness can benefit from the putting in of one of these indoor features. The science behind the idea that water fountains can be good for you is unquestionable. Water features generally generate negative ions which are then balanced out by the positive ions produced by modern conveniences. Favorable changes to both your emotional and physical health take place when the negative ions are overpowered by the positive ions. They also raise serotonin levels, so you begin to feel more aware, relaxed and revitalized. The negative ions emitted by indoor wall fountains promote a better mood as well as get rid of air impurities from your home. Water features also help in eliminating allergens, pollutants among other sorts of irritants. Lastly, the dust particles and micro-organisms floating in the air inside your house are absorbed by water fountains leading to better overall wellness.

The Interesting Origin of the Water Wall Fountain

As the leader of the Catholic Church, the scholarly Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455} decided to commission translations of important invaluable books from Greek to Latin. To further boost his city's prestige, an old aqueduct was reconstructed to improve the supply of fresh drinking water to the city from 8 miles away. (This aqueduct is named the Acqua Vergine) He commenced rebuilding it in 1453. At the same time, he restarted the practice of installing lavish fountains, known as "mostras", to mark the terminal point of an aqueduct. Designer Leon Alberti was ordered to create a wall fountain, a undertaking which grew in size and scope until it turned into the distinguished Trevi Fountain of Rome. Wall fountains have their beginnings in Pope Nicholas V's ambition to influence Christianity and simultaneously improve Rome's water supply.

The Benefits of a Water Fountain in your Workplace

Most customers who visit a business love to see water fountain. The entrance to your company or store is a great place to place a water fountain as will increase traffic flow as well as differentiate you from others. Such businesses as yoga studios, bookstores, coffee shops, and salons can financially profit from installing a water feature nearby. A water fountain will offer the perfect ambiance to a business where people like to gather and relax. Bars or a restaurants that include a water feature will appeal to those who are seeking a romantic setting.

The First Public Fountains

Water fountains were originally practical in purpose, used to convey water from canals or springs to cities and hamlets, providing the inhabitants with clean water to drink, bathe, and prepare food with. A supply of water higher in elevation than the fountain was necessary to pressurize the movement and send water squirting from the fountain's nozzle, a technology without equal until the later part of the nineteenth century. The beauty and wonder of fountains make them ideal for traditional monuments.

The common fountains of today bear little resemblance to the first water fountains. Designed for drinking water and ceremonial reasons, the 1st fountains were very simple carved stone basins. Stone basins are thought to have been 1st made use of around the year 2000 BC. The very first civilizations that used fountains relied on gravity to push water through spigots. Situated near reservoirs or creeks, the functional public water fountains supplied the local populace with fresh drinking water. Wildlife, Gods, and Spiritual figures dominated the initial decorative Roman fountains, beginning to show up in about 6 BC. The remarkable aqueducts of Rome provided water to the spectacular public fountains, most of which you can travel to today.

The Good Aspects of Disappearing Water Features

The name “pondless fountain” is one other way to call a disappearing fountain. It is referred to as “disappearing” since the water source is below ground. Any area where there are people, such as a walking path, is ideal for a disappearing fountain since it adds pleasant sounds and a lovely visual effect. They come in a wide variety of designs, some of which are ceramic urns, waterfalls, granite columns, and millstones.

There are many unique benefits to a disappearing fountain as opposed to other fountains. The water comes from underground and does not create a large pool above ground so any danger to those around it is minimized.

This means that kids can safely hang out around it. Moreover, no water will evaporate since it is not subjected to the open air. Other kinds of fountains use more water due to evaporation. It is extremely low-maintenance since it is below ground and not exposed to dirt or algae. Finally, you can have one just about anywhere given that it takes up so little room.

"Primitive" Greek Artistry: Garden Statuary

The initial freestanding sculpture was developed by the Archaic Greeks, a recognized achievement since until then the sole carvings in existence were reliefs cut into walls and columns. Youthful, attractive male or female (kore) Greeks were the subject matter of most of the statues, or kouros figures. The kouroi, viewed as by the Greeks to symbolize beauty, had one foot extended out of a fixed forward-facing pose and the male figurines were regularly unclothed, with a powerful, powerful build. In about 650 BC, the variations of the kouroi became life-sized. The Archaic period was turbulent for the Greeks as they progressed into more polished forms of government and art, and gained more information about the peoples and societies outside of Greece. However|Nevertheless|Nonetheless}, the Greek civilization was not slowed down by these challenges.

Historic Crete & The Minoans: Outdoor Fountains

During archaeological digs on the island of Crete, a variety of sorts of conduits have been uncovered. They not merely aided with the water supply, they eliminated rainwater and wastewater as well. They were for the most part made from clay or stone. Whenever prepared from terracotta, they were generally in the shape of canals and circular or rectangle-shaped conduits. These included cone-like and U-shaped clay water lines that were distinctive to the Minoans. Knossos Palace had a advanced plumbing system made of terracotta conduits which ran up to three meters below ground. The pipelines also had other uses such as collecting water and channeling it to a central area for storage. These clay pipes were used to perform: Subterranean Water Transportation: It’s not quite understood why the Minoans required to transport water without it being enjoyed. Quality Water Transportation: Many historians consider that these pipelines were utilized to develop a different distribution system for the castle.


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