The First Contemporary Wall Fountains

Hundreds of classic Greek texts were translated into Latin under the authority of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. 50721md__16697.jpg Embellishing Rome and making it the worthy capital of the Christian world was at the core of his ambitions. Reconstruction of the Acqua Vergine, a desolate Roman aqueduct which had transported fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the behest of the Pope. A mostra, a monumental celebratory fountain constructed by ancient Romans to mark the point of arrival of an aqueduct, was a practice which was restored by Nicholas V. At the behest of the Pope, architect Leon Battista Alberti began the construction of a wall fountain in the spot where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The water which eventually provided the Trevi Fountain as well as the acclaimed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona flowed from the modified aqueduct which he had renovated.

Michelangelo’s Roman Wall Fountains

The 16th century saw the creation of the earliest Roman wall fountains, the designs of two celebrated Florentine sculptures, Michelangelo and Ammannati. The fountain in the Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome, which was finished in 1536 and became part of the façade of the Palazzo Senatorio, was Michelangelo’s first creation. Built some years later, a conduit from the Aqua Felice was added which carried water into the Capitol permitting a greater water display. Michelangelo, however, had predicted this which led to use of a larger basin styled on the forms of the late Cinquecento.

Was the reknowned maestro the first to create wall fountains? His designs undoubtedly influenced the style of fountain which dominates throughout Italy. The styles found at the Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone, set between the flight of steps on the main axis of the Villa Pratolino, represent other examples of this style.

It seemed to be Michelangelo’s predestination to combine classic Roman elements into his fountains instead of using his own tremendous talents to design original pieces. The Florentine master was commissioned by Julius III (1550-1555) to design a distinctive fountain to be placed at the top of the passage of the Belvedere in the Vatican. The talented artist was commissioned to design a marble figure of Moses striking a stone from which water streamed forth. Rather than making the Moses statue, which would take too much time to finish, an antique figure of Cleopatra was used in its place, however. Creating a new design by the renown sculptor was thought to be more complicated than placing an ancient figure above the fountain.

The Best Way to Introduce the Benefits of Feng Shui to Your Yard

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will bring its beneficial energy into your home as well.

Do not worry if your yard is considered too little for feng shui design, as size is is not especially relevant. If you have a lavish, eye-catching one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

The same tools you employ to incorporate feng shui design into your home can be used in the garden. The initial part is to figure out the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is important to start by learning how to strengthen each of its five elements.

The Earth element, for example, should be integrated in the northeast part of your garden which is linked to the personal growth and self-cultivation energy in feng shui design. A Zen garden with some nice natural rocks is ideal for that spot, as the rocks epitomize the Earth element.

A water element is a suitable addition to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).

Agrippa's Eye-popping, but Mostly Forgotten Water-Lifting Technology

Although the mechanism designed by Agrippa for raising water earned the esteem of Andrea Bacci in 1588, it seemed to fade not long thereafter. It could perhaps be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest aqueduct, the Acqua Felice, started delivering the Villa Medici, there was no longer a great deal use for the unit. This is all the more sad bearing in mind how impressive Camillo Agrippa’s system was, completely unique in Italy during the hundreds of years which passed between the downfall of ancient Rome and the contemporary period. It could defy gravity to raise water to Renaissance landscapes, nourishing them in a way other late sixteenth century models like scenographic water exhibits, music water fountains and giochi d’acqua or water caprices, were not.

Anglo Saxon Landscapes at the Time of the Norman Conquest

Anglo-Saxons encountered great modifications to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. Engineering and gardening were attributes that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. But before concentrating on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Most often designed upon windy peaks, castles were fundamental structures that allowed their inhabitants to spend time and space to offensive and defensive strategies, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings commonly installed in only the most fecund, extensive valleys. Relaxing activities such as gardening were out of place in these desolate citadels. Berkeley Castle is possibly the most intact model in existence at present of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. As a technique of deterring attackers from tunneling within the walls, an immense terrace encircles the building. On one of these parapets is a scenic bowling green covered in grass and bordered by an aged hedge of yew that has been designed into coarse battlements.

The One Cleaning Solution to NEVER Use On Your Large Garden Fountains

Water fountains will keep working a long time with routine cleaning and maintenance. A typical problem with fountains is that they tend to accumulate dirt and debris, so it is essential that you keep it free from this. Additionally, anywhere light from the sun comes in contact with still water, algae can form. Either sea salt, hydrogen peroxide, or vinegar can be blended into the water to eliminate this issue. Some people opt for pouring bleach into the water, but the problem is that it harms wildlife - so it should be avoided.

Every 3-4 months, garden fountains should go through a good cleaning. Before you can start cleaning it you should drain out all of the water. Then use a soft cloth and mild cleanser to scrub the inside. A good tip is to use a toothbrush if there are tiny hard-to-reach spots. Any soap residue left on your fountain can harm it, so be sure it is all rinsed off.

Make sure you get rid of any calcium or plankton by taking the pump apart and cleaning the inside properly. Letting it soak in vinegar for a couple of hours first will make it much easier to clean. Mineral or rain water, versus tap water, is ideal in order to avoid any build-up of chemicals inside the pump.

Finally, be sure to have a quick look at your fountain daily and add water if you notice that the level is depleted. Allowing the water to go below the pump’s intake level, can cause severe damage and even make the pump burn out - an undesired outcome!

How Useful is a Wall Fountain in your Reception Room?

A patient's state of mind as well as the environment around them can be much improved when a water element is on display in the reception area of your local medical or dental office. It may be that you have considered featuring one in your company's waiting area. Many kinds of businesses such as a newly opened or renovated showroom, medical office, tax office, or spa might benefit from having one in the waiting room.

Clients waiting for an appointment or meeting for a long period of time typically become more restless. They begin to apprehensively look at the clock while thinking about all of the work they should be doing. They may not even note the ticking clock when there is a wall water fountain on show in your waiting room. Your patients or visitors may feel calmer and more relaxed surrounded by the sound and appearance of slowly moving water.

Depending on the weather, most companies turn on the air conditioning or heat in their waiting rooms. The environment is generally dry in such conditions. Water from your wall fountain will gradually evaporate, releasing the right amount of moisture into the air but not enough to make the atmosphere uncomfortably damp. This kind of ambiance will be of benefit to both you and the employees who are in the office all day. You can become more prone to health issues because the dry air impacts the mucous membranes in your body. Furthermore, it conributes to dry lips and skin as well as irritated eyes, lifeless hair, and brittle nails. One of the benefits of water fountains is that they make for excellent natural humidifiers.

Wall water fountains also contribute to a sense of peacefulness because they muffle annoying sounds. The clatter of medical equipment, phones, faxes, or office clamor is not pleasing to the ear. While the noises your guests hear will be less annoying, they will not be completely cancelled out.

Fountains create a memorable impression in addition to producing a favorable environment. Investing in one of these can give you the unique selling point you want. Furthermore, by adding the name of your business or its logo on a water fountain can become a useful marketing tool.


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Agrippa’s Intriguing Water-lifting Machine
The admiration Agrippa’s water-lifting invention was given from Andrea Bacci in 1588 was temporary. Only years afterward, in 1592, the earliest contemporary Roman... read more