Fountains Having Many Levels

p-508__09377.jpg Fountains with more than one level are very easy to find, and popular above all in gardens. These types of fountains are popular in Italy, Spain, and other Mediterranean nations. While they can be located anywhere, they are most common in the center of building complexes and in popular areas where people get together. Tiered fountains come in a wide array of designs, from elaborately carved styles to relatively plain types.

People love to showcase them in spots having a classic look and feel. The fountain should look as old as the rest of the space and blend in accordingly.

Water Features Commonplace in Japanese Gardens

Japanese gardens typically include a water element. They tend to be located right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are considered representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. It is uncommon to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains because the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Many people also get a water fountain that includes a bamboo spout. Below the bamboo spout is generally a stone basin which receives the water as it trickles down from the spout. In addition, it is important to the overall look that it appear as if it has been outside for a long time. It is essential that the overall look of the fountain fits in with the natural environment, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just nice decoration.

An alternate approach is to get a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. Over the years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Wherever there is plenty of open space, you have the option to build a more extensive water feature. Popular water feature additions are a koi pond or any sort of tiny pool, or even a wandering brook.

However, water does not need to be an element in a Japanese water fountain. It is okay to use representations of water in place of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. In addition, flat stones can be laid out close enough together to give the illusion of a rippling brook.

Admire the Beauty of The Cascade Fountain at Garden of Chatsworth

The Cascade garden fountain creates a spectacular garden decoration at the back of Chatsworth House. Twenty-four irregularly positioned stone steps in a series run along 200 yards in the direction of the house and down the hillside. Based on a 17th century French design, the Cascade is also completely gravity fed. Remaining unaltered since its inception, this water fountain was originally created for the first Duke of Devonshire in 1696. At the top of the fountain, from which water runs downward, rests the Cascade House. Underwater creatures in bas-relief beautify the exterior of the residence which is a small construction. Leading to the Cascade House to become part of the Cascade spectacle, on special occasions water pressure to the Cascade can be increased, as liquid flows through piping on its roof and from the jaws of its carved sea creatures, before carrying on down the Cascade. The sound of the water plunging differs as it falls down the Cascades mainly because of the slight difference in the size of every single step thereby providing a great and calming accompaniment to a walking through the gardens. Back in 2004, Chatsworth's Cascade was recognized by historians at Country Life as the best water fountain in England.

The Beauty of Splash Fountains

People see splash fountains, or bathing fountains, as a great way to cool off on days when it is very hot outside. Due to this, they are often referred to as interactive fountains. Allowing easy entry, these fountains also include nonslip surfaces and no standing water to prevent drowning risks or the need for lifeguards or supervision. These ”spraygardens”, or "splash pads", are commonly found in public swimming pools, public parks and public play areas. Many splash fountains, such as the one in Dundas Square in Toronto, Canada, heat the water by the use of solar energy captured via the special dark-colored granite slabs. This water feature includes six-hundred ground nozzles in groups of thirty (three rows of 10 spigots). Every grouping of the 30 nozzles is found underneath a stainless-steel grille. In the center of the main passageway through Dundas Square are 20 grates organized in 2 rows of 10.

Original Water Delivery Solutions in Rome

With the development of the first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, people who lived on the city’s hillsides no longer had to be dependent exclusively on naturally-occurring spring water for their requirements. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone technological innovations available at the time to supply water to locations of greater elevation. From the early sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill via the subterranean channel of Acqua Vergine.

Pozzi, or manholes, were engineered at standard stretches along the aqueduct’s channel. During the roughly nine years he had the residence, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi used these manholes to take water from the channel in containers, though they were actually designed for the intent of cleaning and servicing the aqueduct. Reportedly, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t enough to meet his needs. That is when he made the decision to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran underneath his residence.

Musical Fountains and Their Amazing Notes

Musical fountains, often referred to as dancing fountains, are animated, visually eye-catching fountains used for recreational purposes. The resulting effect of timed sound waves and timed light - including lasers- hitting against water molecules creates an amazing show. When the water refracts and reflects the light, it emits incredible three-dimensional images.

To create such an installation, hundreds of lights and water jets are needed, and can end up costing millions of dollars. Such a huge musical feature is very challenging to build because of all the technical, hydraulic, and electrical components required to create the amazing effects - and could be considered more amazing than the actual show.

The jaw-dropping musical fountain in Dubai is without a doubt the greatest such project globally. Designed by California based WET Design, which also fashioned the celebrated Las Vegas fountain at the Bellagio Hotel, it spans the 30-acre man-made Burj Khalifa Lake. This fountain makes use of an incredible 6,600 lights, 25 colored projectors, fog and fire. Incredibly, it measures 207-meters (902 feet) and propels water 150 meters (490 feet) high - this is equal to a 50-story building- and plays an variety of music including classical to modern Arabic and world music. The final price tag was an estimated 218 million US dollars. May 8, 2009 saw the formal opening of the fountain and the Dubai Mall by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum. One has the best view of the fountain, located in front of the Burj Khalifa, from the Souk Al Bahar or the Dubai Mall.

The Tallest Fountains Across the World

Known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. The water here jets up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this water fountain is the tallest in the United States.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water jets 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of pushing water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are functioning.

The Dubai Fountain made its first appearance in 2009 next to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded music and propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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