Directions for Hanging a Wall Water Element

Make any room much better with a wall fountain. A waterfall will bring a feeling of relaxation with the comforting sounds of moving water. While any space will benefit from a wall fountain, they are most often hung in foyers. Although the instructions for putting one up are fairly straightforward there will be slight modifications depending on the model. Bear in mind that different components will need to be put together during assembly. 115441_4401__30319.jpg The bottom and the upper section will need to be put together as well as the pump and the tubing. The directions should be read first to make sure it is put together correctly. The assembly technique is quite simple to understand. Note, however, that the instructions for your specific model can vary slightly. The easiest way to make sure it is positioned correctly is to recruit another person to hold it where you want it while you mark the wall. A level is the best tool to ensure it is mounted correctly. Mark the wall where you want the upper end of the wall fountain as well as the bottom. Wall fountains can be hung in two ways. You will find slots on the back side of the wall fountain which can be hung directly onto the screws. Alternatively, you could affix brackets to the wall and use those. The bracket alternative is best, particularly for wall fountains that are big and bulky. Decide where the brackets need to be positioned and mark the wall accordingly. Utilize a drill to make the pilot holes on the wall for the drywall anchors. Carefully hammer the anchors into your wall. The brackets can then be mounted on the wall utilizing a screwdriver or cordless drill. It is then time to hang your wall fountain onto the mounting brackets. Ensure that it is firmly mounted and level. Water can be added after the fountain has been secured. Make certain there is enough water to cover the pump. Plug the pump into the wall and see the water begin to circulate. Carefully add just enough water to reach one inch below the top edge of the basin. Never fill the basin all the way to the top or it will overflow anytime the pump is not on.

The water level will rise because all of the flowing water will settle down at the bottom of the basin. Whenever there is too much water, it will spill out and can wreck your floor and furnishings.

Bernini’s First Italian Fountains

The Barcaccia, Bernini's very first fountain, is a striking chef d'oeuvre built at the bottom of the Trinita dei Monti in Piaza di Spagna. Roman locals and site seers who appreciate verbal exchanges as well as being the company of others still go to this spot. One of the city’s most fashionable meeting places are the streets surrounding Bernini's fountain, which would certainly have brought a smile to the great Bernini. The master's very first fountain of his career was built at around 1630 at the behest of Pope Urbano VIII. The fountain’s central motif is based on an a massive boat slowly sinking into the Mediterranean Sea. The great flooding of the Tevere that covered the whole region with water in the 16th was commemorated by this momentous fountain as recorded by documents dating back to this period. In what turned out to be his only extended absence from Italy, Bernini {journeyed | traveled] to France in 1665.

The Early, Largely Ignored, Water-Moving Solution

The compliments Agrippa’s water-lifting innovation was given by Andrea Bacci in 1588 was short-lived. It may be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest waterway, the Acqua Felice, set about providing the Villa Medici, there was no longer a great deal use for the system. Its triumph may have been temporary but the system conceived by Camillo Agrippa was yet different from anything designed in Italy during the time period that separated the modern age from classic Rome. Although there were various other important water-driven designs either projected or built during the latter part of the sixteenth century, like scenographic water demonstrations, giochi d’acqua or water caprices, and melodious fountains, not one was fed by water like Agrippa’s system.

The Intriguing Origin of the Wall Fountain

As the leader of the Catholic Church, the scholarly Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455} decided to commission translations of important invaluable texts from Greek to Latin. To further boost his city's prestige, an old aqueduct was reconstructed to improve the supply of fresh drinking water to the city from eight miles away. (This aqueduct is known as the Acqua Vergine) He commenced rebuilding it in 1453. The Pope also restarted the tradition of using spectacular and breathtaking water fountains, known as "mostras", to mark the entrance point of an aqueduct. Designer Leon Alberti was commissioned to develop a wall fountain, a undertaking which grew in size and scope until it became the celebrated Trevi Fountain of Rome. Wall fountains have their beginnings in Pope Nicholas V's ambition to have an impact on Christianity and at the same time enhance Rome's water supply.

Eco-Friendly Fountains: Good for the Environment

Do you want to make your personal space just a little more beautiful? Well, you can add that special touch and augment the price of your home just by adding a solar water fountain. Solar powered water features can be a wiser investment versus electric ones because they not only improve one's well-being but they offer other interesting financial perks. While you may spend a bit upfront, the savings that you make in the long-run are worth it. Despite periodic power outages, your fountain will not be affected because it does not run on electricity.

Your monthly electric bill will most probably increase with running water fountains. Even though you might not instantly see the short-term benefits, remember that your home will certainly gain in value in the long-term.

Spending more money on our electric bills is not the only downside - the environment is highly impacted too. Solar powered water fountains get their energy straight from the sun thus making them the optimal “green” fountain. Using solar energy to heat or cool your house is much better for our planet.

Less maintenance is a result of installing this kind of fountain. Since these do not run using an electric motor that could clog up with debris, they need little cleaning. Which ultimately means more time to chill out in your yard.

Garden Fountains as Commemorative Pieces

For a loved one you have lost, a garden fountain can make a wonderful memorial. Age-old practices are frequently met with resistance nowadays. Honoring loved ones who have passed away is still the standard, however. Some memorials might feature a number of personal items. They come in many shapes and sizes, and backyard garden fountains are really popular. There are lots of ways to individualize your garden fountain in your loved one’s memory such as planting flowers including, attaching a plaque, or gathering for memorial services around the fountain.

People you have lost can be commemorated in a beautiful loving manner with garden fountains. Give thanks for the success, abundance, and good fortune of the defunct with the symbolic flowing water of a fountain. In order to last a long time, your garden fountain should be well made, strong, and resistant to bad weather. You will want to be certain that your memorial will endure many years once in place.

Water Transport Solutions in Early Rome

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct founded in Rome, began delivering the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, although they had depended on natural springs up till then. When aqueducts or springs weren’t accessible, people living at greater elevations turned to water pulled from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. To deliver water to Pincian Hill in the early 16th century, they employed the emerging method of redirecting the flow from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground network. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. The manholes made it easier to maintain the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we discovered with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he operated the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. The cistern he had constructed to collect rainwater wasn’t satisfactory to meet his water demands. That is when he made the decision to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran under his residence.


Chatsworth Gardens and the "Revelation" Water Feature
Angela Conner, the well-known British sculptor, fashioned “Revelation,” the newest acquisition to the ornamental outdoor fountains of Chatsworth. In 2004/2005 she was commissioned by the late ... read more
The Latest Addition to the Gardens of Chatsworth: Revelation
“Revelation,” the most recent acquisition to the decorative garden fountains of Chatsworth, was developed by recognized British sculptor Angela Conner. She was delegated by the deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to produce a limited edition bust of Queen... read more
Bernini's Fountains
In Rome’s city center, there are countless easily recognized water fountains. One of the greatest sculptors and designers of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini... read more
Water Delivery Solutions in Historic Rome
Rome’s very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, residents residing at higher elevations had to rely on local streams for their water. During this time period,... read more