A Brief History of Early Public Fountains

Villages and villages depended on practical water fountains to channel water for cooking, washing, and cleaning from local sources like ponds, streams, or springs. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was needed to pressurize the movement and send water spraying from the fountain's nozzle, a technology without equal until the late 19th century. 144533-1901__19040.jpg The beauty and wonder of fountains make them appropriate for historic monuments. If you saw the earliest fountains, you probably would not recognize them as fountains. A stone basin, crafted from rock, was the 1st fountain, used for containing water for drinking and religious purposes. The original stone basins are believed to be from about 2000 BC. The earliest civilizations that made use of fountains relied on gravity to drive water through spigots. These original water fountains were built to be functional, often situated along aqueducts, creeks and waterways to supply drinking water. The people of Rome began building elaborate fountains in 6 B.C., most of which were bronze or natural stone masks of animals and mythological heroes. A well-engineered collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

Modern Garden Decor: Garden Fountains and their Beginnings

A fountain, an incredible piece of engineering, not only supplies drinking water as it pours into a basin, it can also propel water high into the air for an extraordinary effect.

Pure functionality was the original role of fountains. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, via aqueducts or springs in the vicinity. Up to the late 19th century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and higher than the fountain so that gravity could make the water flow down or shoot high into the air. Fountains were not only utilized as a water source for drinking water, but also to decorate homes and celebrate the designer who created it. Roman fountains usually depicted imagery of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller models of the gardens of paradise. Fountains enjoyed a considerable role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exert his power over nature. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries manufactured baroque decorative fountains to exalt the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the spot where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

The end of the 19th century saw the increase in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. Amazing water effects and recycled water were made possible by replacing the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Decorating city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the purposes of modern-day fountains.

Instructions for Mounting a Wall Water Fountain

Wall fountains can complement any space. A waterfall will bring a feeling of tranquility with the comforting sounds of moving water. Entryways are common places for wall fountains, but they can also be displayed in any common space. Although each model might have slight differences on how to hang it, the basic instructions are the same for all. Set-up will include putting together various parts. You should first attach the foundation to the upper portion, then connect the pump and the tubing. It is advisable to carefully check out the directions before you begin the assembly process. The set-up technique is quite easy to grasp. Keep in mind, though, that each model might need a slight change. Do not hesitate to get someone to assist you to hold the wall fountain in the right place while you make a little mark on the wall. A level is the best tool to ensure it is installed straight. Draw your markings at both the top and the bottom. Your wall fountain can be hung in one of two ways. There are holes on the back which can be placed onto the screws you place on the wall. The other method is to mount it on brackets you have secured to the wall. The second option is best, especially for bigger wall fountains.

Mark the point on the wall where the brackets need to be attached. Bore pilot holes in the wall where you need to place the drywall anchors. Gently hammer the anchors into the wall. Hold the brackets in position on the wall and use a portable drill or screwdriver to attach them. It is then time to hang your wall fountain onto the mounting brackets. Make sure that it is perfectly straight and not loose. Add water once the wall fountain is up. Use sufficient water so that the pump is completely submerged. The water will begin to circulate as soon as you plug in your fountain. The water basin should be filled to about one inch below the top end. The basin will overflow when the pump is switched off if it’s too full, so be sure not to fill it completely. Once the pump is turned off the water all settles at the bottom of the bowl, causing the water level to rise. If the fountain is overly full, water can spill out and cause damage to the immediate area.

Mounted Wall Water Features: A Great Decoration Idea

A wall mounted feature may be the ideal addition to your home or yard. Is this sort of water element too bulky for your home? Eliminate this problem with a wall fountain. Putting one on a wall, fence or post are just some of the locations best suited for this purpose. Two things you must do after you choose the best spot for your water feature are to fill it with water and plug in the pump. Your inside or outdoor space now has a functioning water fountain. Where you display your wall fountain should be carefully thought out before installing it. Use your imagination to picture the perfect place to set up your wall fountain.

Look at your fountain under different lights including daylight and evening light, as this will affect its final look.

Water Transport Strategies in Ancient Rome

With the development of the 1st raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, folks who lived on the city’s foothills no longer had to rely only on naturally-occurring spring water for their requirements. If residents residing at higher elevations did not have accessibility to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to be dependent on the other existing systems of the day, cisterns that collected rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from under ground. In the early 16th century, the city began to make use of the water that flowed below ground through Acqua Vergine to deliver drinking water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. During the some nine years he owned the property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi employed these manholes to take water from the network in buckets, though they were originally built for the goal of maintaining and maintaining the aqueduct. He didn’t get enough water from the cistern that he had constructed on his residential property to obtain rainwater. Via an orifice to the aqueduct that ran underneath his property, he was able to reach his water desires.

Agrippa's Astonishing, but Mostly Forgotten Water-Lifting Device

The admiration Agrippa’s water-lifting invention was given from Andrea Bacci in 1588 was temporal. It could be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest channel, the Acqua Felice, began delivering the Villa Medici, there was no longer much use for the system. Even though it is more very likely that it was essentially disposed of when Ferdinando relinquished his cardinalship and moved back to Florence, protecting his position as the Grand Duke of Tuscany, following the loss of his brother, Francesco di Medici, in 1588. There might have been other impressive water-related works in Renaissance landscapes in the late sixteenth century, like water fountains that played music, water caprices (or giochi d’acqua) and also scenographic water exhibits, but nothing were motorized by water which defied gravitation.

Integrating Feng Shui into Your Garden

Feel the health benefits of feng shui by adding its design elements into your yard.

Do not fret if your garden is considered too little for feng shui design, as size is relatively unimportant. Of course, a huge area is fantastic if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller areas as well.

The same tools you employ to incorporate feng shui design into your living space can be used in the garden. In order to understand the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first want to understand your home’s bagua.

It is also essential to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to make the most of its energy.

The Earth element, for example, should be positioned in the northeast section of your garden which is linked to the personal growth and self-cultivation energy in feng shui design. A Zen garden with some pretty natural rocks is ideal for that spot, as the rocks epitomize the Earth element.

Consider incorporating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).


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