The Source of Modern Fountains

Hundreds of classic Greek records were translated into Latin under the auspices of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. p_593__10380.jpg In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope decided to enhance the beauty of the city. Starting in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent repair at the behest of the Pope. Building a mostra, a grandiose commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to memorialize the entry point of an aqueduct, was a custom revived by Nicholas V. The present-day location of the Trevi Fountain was once occupied by a wall fountain commissioned by the Pope and built by the architect Leon Battista Alberti. The Trevi Fountain as well as the well-known baroque fountains found in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona were eventually supplied with water from the altered aqueduct he had rebuilt.

Water Delivery Solutions in Ancient Rome

Rome’s 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants residing at higher elevations had to depend on local springs for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t accessible, people dwelling at higher elevations turned to water pulled from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill by way of the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. Spanning the length of the aqueduct’s network were pozzi, or manholes, that gave access. Whilst these manholes were developed to make it less difficult to manage the aqueduct, it was also feasible to use containers to pull water from the channel, which was done by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he acquired the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. Whilst the cardinal also had a cistern to amass rainwater, it couldn't supply enough water. That is when he decided to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran directly below his property.

The Prevalence of Water Elements in Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is whole without a water feature. They tend to be put right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are considered representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simplistic because they are meant to draw attention to the water itself.

Many people also opt for a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically constructed of natural rocks, and water trickles out. It should have a worn-down, weathered appearance as well. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are often put in place around a fountain so that it seems more connected with nature. Clearly, this fountain is something more than just a basic decoration.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it artistically with live bamboo and other natural elements. Gradually moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area starts to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

Wherever there is enough open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Charming add-ons include a babbling creek or tiny pool with koi in it.

There are different options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Lots of people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. You can also gather flat stones and put them close enough together that they look like water in motion.

Garden Fountains: Installation Guidelines

A water source and an electrical socket are two crucial items that many people do not take into account when determining where they want to put in their garden fountain. The thrill of owning one occasionally causes people to overlook the technical details when setting it up for the first time. If you need an extension cord to reach a 120v wall socket, feel free to use one, as conventional power cords are only 12 feet long. You will need to replenish your fountain with water so make sure there is a source of water close by. Carrying large quantities of water requires strength so you do not want to have to carry it a long distance. If you have thought about it before installation, having a hose nearby will make the task of filling the fountain much easier. The ideal setup is with a water fountain autofill, but this has to be connected to an external water line and needs a professional to install it.

The Original Public Garden Fountains of History

As initially developed, fountains were crafted to be practical, guiding water from creeks or reservoirs to the citizens of towns and villages, where the water could be utilized for cooking food, cleaning, and drinking. To generate water flow through a fountain until the late 1800’s, and generate a jet of water, mandated the force of gravity and a water source such as a spring or reservoir, positioned higher than the fountain. Fountains throughout history have been designed as monuments, impressing hometown citizens and travelers alike. If you saw the 1st fountains, you wouldn't identify them as fountains. Crafted for drinking water and ceremonial functions, the 1st fountains were very simple carved stone basins. The oldest stone basins are believed to be from about 2000 BC. The force of gravity was the power source that controlled the initial water fountains. Positioned near reservoirs or creeks, the practical public water fountains supplied the local citizens with fresh drinking water. Creatures, Gods, and spectral figures dominated the initial ornate Roman fountains, starting to show up in about 6 B.C.. A well-engineered system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public fountains supplied with fresh water.

Garden Fountains Benefit your Office Environment

Your commercial surroundings can benefit with a garden fountain. Attract customers to your business with this type of beautiful element. Commercial areas, as opposed to home environments, need to have outdoor fountains that make the place feel enticing and leave a positive impression on guests and employees.

Important to the growth of any firm, they are a way to draw in new customers and make a positive first impression. Do not fret if you only have a limited space, including a garden water fountain and some beautiful flowers will go a long way. On the other hand, many corporate areas have lots of open space to go all out and create an alluring garden display. That said, there are a lot that only have room for a little display with which to create an impressive and lasting statement.

The primary idea here is that you need to bring in new customers and make a lasting impact. An appealing garden fountain is like having a welcoming committee for new clients outside your workplace at all times.

Why You Should Get A Pond Fountain

When someone mentions fountains, you usually think of the great sculptured ones found in parks, in front of hotels, etc. That said, in reality they can be made of any style and size, and do not only belong in public locations. A pond fountain can be a wonderful add-on to your own yard.

Two key benefits can result from getting one of your own. To begin with, fountains add elegance and help everyone chill out. What better way to wind down than to listen to the trickle of water and experience its charm. You will see your environment benefitting from its elegance, too. Additionally, when you have visitors over, they will want to hang out around your gorgeous fountain, making your gatherings even more fun.

The second reason for a water element is to provide a healthy environment for the fish in your pond. Fish are much better off if their water is flowing around and getting oxygen, and a pond fountain will do both of those things. Your fish will enjoy longer, healthier lives because of the flow of the water and the improved oxygen level. You should see healthier plant life too.


Original Water Delivery Techniques in The City Of Rome
Rome’s first raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, residents residing at higher elevations had to depend on natural springs for their water. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were... read more
Aqueducts: The Remedy to Rome's Water Problems
With the construction of the first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, people who lived on the city’s hills no longer had to depend only on naturally-occurring spring water for their demands. When... read more
Agrippa's Astonishing, but Mostly Forgotten Water-Lifting Device
The admiration Agrippa’s water-lifting creation was given by Andrea Bacci in 1588 was short-lived. It could be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest channel, the Acqua Felice, began delivering the Villa Medici, there was no longer much use for the unit. Its success... read more
The Early, Largely Ignored, Water-Moving System
The compliments Agrippa’s water-lifting invention earned by Andrea Bacci in 1588 was temporal. It may have become obsolete once the Villa Medici was enabled to receive water from the Acqua Felice, the early contemporary channel, in 1592. Even though its... read more