Multi-Tiered Water Elements: What Are They?

For many years now now, multi-tiered fountains have been common, most notably in gardens. The regions in the southern region of Europe tend to have a lot of these types of fountains. The courtyards of buildings and public squares are just a couple the areas you might see one. a-356__45392.jpg All multi-level fountains are alluring, although some have much more lavish carvings than others.

People love to showcase them in spots having a classic look and feel. It should look as if the fountain has been part of the decor since the beginning and should blend in accordingly.

Eco-Friendly Fountains: Good for the Planet

Have you always wanted to beautify the look of your residence? Well, you can add that extra touch and increase the price of your home just by adding a solar water fountain. They are the same as electric fountains in that they help with one's overall well-being but they also offer monetary benefits. Even though there may be a significantly greater cost at the beginning, the long-term investment will make it worthwhile. You will not have to concern yourself about energy shortages as your fountain will not be powered by electricity.

Running water fountains means that your use of electricity will increase and thus your monthly bill. Even though you might not instantly see the short-term benefits, remember that your home will certainly gain in value in the long-term.

Higher bills is not the only issue with using more electricity, the environment takes a big hit as well. Solar driven water fountains are a good alternative to becoming “green”. Using solar energy to heat or cool your home is much better for our environment.

This type of fountain needs less upkeep than others. Since these do not work using an electric generator that could clog up with debris, they need little cleaning.

And this means more fun for you!

The World’s Tallest Fountains

Referred to as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) found in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. The water here jets up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Coming in 2nd is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

Located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is 3rd placed Gateway Geyser (1995). With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this water fountain is the tallest in the United States.

The next on the list is Port Fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan which rockets water 190 meters (620 feet) into the sky.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of pushing water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are functioning.

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is located next to highest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded songs and shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Making it in the top 8 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra (1970) which measures 147 meters (482 feet).

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).

Water Features Commonplace in Japanese Gardens

A water feature is an important part of any Japanese garden.

Since Japanese water fountains are considered emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. It is uncommon to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains because the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Bamboo is a popular material to use for spouts and therefore often added into water fountains. The water moves through the bamboo spout and accumulates in the stone basin below. It should have a worn-down, weathered look and feel as well. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are often put in place around a fountain so that it seems more in line with nature. Clearly this fountain is much more than merely a nice add-on.

If you want to get a bit more artistic, try a stone fountain decorated with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. The point is that over time it will start to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape, as moss slowly grows over the stones.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, install a much larger water feature. Lots of people include a koi pond or a tiny stream as a final touch.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not actually need to have water in them. Pretty rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to symbolize the water. The illusion of a creek with trickling water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

What You Need to Have for a Garden Water Fountain

A lot of people forget the need for an electrical socket or water source close by when contemplating where to locate their garden fountain. Occasionally new owners get so caught up in the romance of their new purchase that they forget important details. Do not forget that an extension cord can be helpful if your 120v power source is more than 12 feet away, as that is the typical length of power cords. Install your fountain in a place near a water source as you will need to replenish it. Transporting water is tough and laborious. A nearby hose can make filling the fountain a great deal more convenient. A water fountain autofill will make your life easier in the long run, but this requires a professional to install since it must be connected to an external water line.

Anglo-Saxon Landscapes During the Norman Conquest

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was considerably changed by the arrival of the Normans in the later eleventh century. Engineering and horticulture were abilities that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. But before concentrating on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire society. Most often constructed upon windy summits, castles were straightforward constructs that enabled their inhabitants to devote time and space to offensive and defensive strategies, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings frequently installed in only the most fecund, extensive valleys. The bare fortresses did not provide for the calm avocation of gardening. The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is represented in Berkeley Castle, which is perhaps the most untouched illustration we have. It is said that the keep was developed during William the Conqueror's time. As a strategy of deterring assailants from tunneling under the walls, an immense terrace encompasses the building. On one of these terraces lies a charming bowling green: it is coated in grass and flanked by an old yew hedge that is formed into the shape of rough ramparts.

Water Transport Solutions in Early Rome

Previous to 273, when the very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in Roma, residents who lived on hills had to go further down to get their water from natural sources. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people living at higher elevations turned to water drawn from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a unique strategy was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean portions to provide water to Pincian Hill. Throughout the time of its original construction, pozzi (or manholes) were added at set intervals alongside the aqueduct’s channel. The manholes made it less demanding to maintain the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we discovered with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he bought the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. The cistern he had built to collect rainwater wasn’t sufficient to meet his water demands. That is when he made the decision to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran below his residential property.


Chatsworth Gardens and the Revelation Fountain
Angela Conner, the well-known British sculptor, fashioned “Revelation,” the most recent acquisition to the decorative exterior fountains of Chatsworth. In... read more
Gardens of Chatworth and the "Revelation" Water Feature
Designed by celebrated British sculptor Angela Conner, "Revelation" is the most recent addition to the Chatsworth decorative exterior fountains. She was commissioned by the now deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a limited... read more
The Most Recent Addition to the Chatsworth Gardens: Revelation
Created by celebrated English sculptor Angela Conner, Revelation is the latest addition to the Chatsworth decorative outdoor water fountains. In 2004/2005 she was commissioned by the now deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a... read more
Builders of the First Water Features
Water feature designers were multi-talented individuals from the 16th to the late 18th century, often working as architects, sculptors, artisans, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one... read more
Ancient Fountain Designers
Frequently serving as architects, sculptors, designers, engineers and discerning scholars, all in one, fountain creators were multi-faceted people from the... read more