Setting up a Wall Water Fountain in Your Residence

Any room will benefit from the addition of a wall fountain. A waterfall will bring a feeling of relaxation with the comforting sounds of moving water. Entryways are common places for wall fountains, but they can also be displayed in any common space. How to install one varies somewhat depending on the model, but there are some general directions that apply to all of them. Note that different pieces will need to be put together during assembly. 6285-8303__07467.jpg The foundation and the upper section will need to be put together as well as the pump and the tubing. Remember to review the directions before getting started in order to avert errors. It is usually a straight-forward process. Note, however, that the guidelines for your particular model can vary slightly. Another person can be useful to hold the wall fountain in the right spot so that you can mark the wall. A level is the best tool to ensure it is hung correctly. Both the top and the base should be marked. Wall features can be installed in more than just one way. You will find holes on the back side of the wall fountain which can be hung directly onto the screws. Alternatively, you can install brackets to the wall and use those. This option tends to be recommended for large wall fountains. Put a mark on the wall where the brackets will best fit on your wall fountain.

Utilize a drill to make the pilot holes on the wall for the drywall anchors. Place the anchors in the wall using a hammer. The brackets can then be mounted on the wall with a screwdriver or wireless drill. It is then time to hang your wall fountain onto the mounting brackets. Ensure that it is properly installed and straight. Add some water once the wall fountain is up. Make certain there is sufficient water to cover the pump. It is now time to plug it in and observe the water trickle. Slowly add more water until it comes within an inch of the top of the basin. Note that it will overflow when not pumping if you fill it to the top edge. The water level will rise because all of the circulating water will settle down at the bottom part of the basin. When the fountain is too full, water can spill out and cause damage to the nearby area.

The Popularity of Japanese Water Features

No Japanese garden is finished without a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are considered symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most important element of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

Bamboo is a common material to use for spouts and therefore often incorporated into water fountains. The bamboo spout is placed over the basin, typically crafted of natural rocks, and water trickles out. It must have a worn-down, weathered look and feel as well. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more in line with nature. Clearly this fountain is much more than simply a nice add-on.

If you want to get a bit more creative, try a stone fountain enhanced with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

If you are fortunate enough to have a big section of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Lots of people include a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

Water, however, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Lots of people prefer to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to give the illusion of running water.

Chatsworth Garden: The Cascade Fountain

At the back of Chatsworth House, the Cascade garden water fountain forms a dazzling focal point to the landscape. Twenty-four irregularly spread stone steps stretch down the hillside for 200 yards in the direction of the residence. The Cascade, also totally gravity fed, is based on a 17th century French format. This water fountain has continued unmodified after being designed for the first Duke of Devonshire in 1696. At the top of the fountain, from which water flows downward, stands the Cascade House. Decorated on the outside of the house with deep-sea creatures in bas-relief, the home is a smaller building. Just before continuing down the Cascade, on important occasions water pressure to the Cascade can be increased, causing the Cascade House to become part of the Cascade display, as water flows through piping on its rooftop and originating from the mouths of its carved ocean creatures. The sound of the water cascading varies as it descends down the Cascades, providing a fantastic and comforting complement to a stroll through the gardens and produced by the slight variation of each step. This cascade was chosen in a survey, carried out by Country Life in 2004, as England'sbest water feature.

From Where Did Water Fountains Originate?

Himself a highly educated man, Pope Nicholas V led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 till 1455 and was responsible for the translation of hundreds of ancient documents from their original Greek into Latin. In order to make Rome deserving of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city. Starting in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent reconstruction at the bidding of the Pope. The ancient Roman tradition of building an awe-inspiring commemorative fountain at the point where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was resurrected by Nicholas V. The Trevi Fountain now occupies the space formerly filled with a wall fountain crafted by Leon Battista Albert, an architect employed by the Pope. The Trevi Fountain as well as the well-known baroque fountains found in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona were eventually supplied with water from the altered aqueduct he had reconstructed.

Water-lifting System by Camillo Agrippa

Though the machine developed by Agrippa for lifting water attained the respect of Andrea Bacci in 1588, it appeared to fade not long thereafter. Only years afterward, in 1592, the early modern Roman conduit, the Acqua Felice, was hooked up to the Medici’s villa, possibly making the device outdated. Even though its glory was passing, Camillo Agrippa’s concept for raising water was the marvel of its day, surpassing everything built in Italy since the days of early Rome. It might violate gravity to raise water to Renaissance landscapes, supplying them in a way other late sixteenth century models such as scenographic water exhibits, melodious fountains and giochi d’acqua or water caprices, were not.

The Earliest Documented Water Fountains of the Historical Past

Water fountains were originally practical in function, used to convey water from canals or creeks to towns and villages, supplying the inhabitants with clean water to drink, wash, and cook with. The force of gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the end of the 19th century, using the potent power of water traveling down hill from a spring or brook to squeeze the water through valves or other outlets. The elegance and spectacle of fountains make them ideal for historic monuments. The common fountains of today bear little resemblance to the first water fountains. The 1st known water fountain was a natural stone basin carved that served as a receptacle for drinking water and ceremonial functions. Stone basins as fountains have been uncovered from 2,000 B.C.. The force of gravity was the energy source that controlled the initial water fountains. Positioned near reservoirs or creeks, the functional public water fountains furnished the local populace with fresh drinking water. Fountains with ornate decoration began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, normally gods and wildlife, made with stone or bronze. The people of Rome had an intricate system of aqueducts that supplied the water for the countless fountains that were situated throughout the urban center.

Where did Large Garden Fountains Originate from?

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to supply drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Originally, fountains only served a practical purpose. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to supply potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Up to the late nineteenth century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and more elevated than the fountain so that gravity could make the water move downwards or shoot high into the air. Acting as an element of decoration and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often times used by Romans to beautify their fountains. To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages added fountains to their designs. To show his dominance over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries created baroque decorative fountains to exalt the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the location where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

The end of the nineteenth century saw the increase in usage of indoor plumbing to supply drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to purely decorative elements. Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to permit fountains to bring in clean water and allow for beautiful water displays.

Modern fountains are used to adorn community spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.


Gardens of Chatworth: The "Revelation" Fountain
“Revelation,” the latest acquisition to the decorative outdoor fountains of Chatsworth, was designed by well-known British sculptor Angela Conner. The late... read more
The Circulation of Water Fountain Manufacturing Knowledge in Europe
Contributing to the development of scientific technology were the published papers and illustrated publications of the time. They were also the principal method of transferring useful hydraulic ideas and fountain design ideas throughout Europe. An... read more
The Early Civilization: Outdoor Fountains
On the Greek island of Crete, excavations have discovered conduits of different varieties. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. Virtually all were made from clay or stone. When made from... read more
A Brief History of the First Water Garden Fountains
Water fountains were initially practical in purpose, used to deliver water from rivers or creeks to towns and hamlets, supplying the inhabitants with fresh water to drink, wash, and prepare food with. The force of gravity was... read more